We Love Animals
Disney Movie

Proof Disney Disney Recycles Its Own Footage And It’s Hilariously On Point

Have you ever watched a Disney animated scene and suddenly felt like it’s just weirdly familiar somehow? No no, it’s not the déjà vu thing we are talking about. You actually did watch that scene, only it was a little bit different back then. In fact, you might have even watched some different versions of the scene in different movies already, because Disney did have the habit of reusing their animations, a lot.

Recently, a YouTuber has brought many recycled Disney footage together in an interesting video and honestly, those similarities have blown our minds. And since it’s only titled as the first part, we have a reason to believe more of these remarkable comparisons would come in the future.

Think twice before scrolling down, because you can’t unsee it:

#1. The Jungle Book (1967) vs Robin Hood (1973)

Source: Movie Munchies

#2. Snow White (1937) vs Robin Hood (1973)

Source: Movie Munchies

#3. The Sword in the Stone (1963) vs The Jungle Book (1967)

Source: Movie Munchies

#4. The Jungle Book (1967) vs Robin Hood (1973)

Source: Movie Munchies

#5. Pinocchio (1940) vs Alice in Wonderland (1951)

Source: Movie Munchies

#6. Sleeping beauty (1959) vs Beauty and the Beast (1991)

Source: Movie Munchies

#7. Snow White (1937) vs Robin Hood (1973)

Source: Movie Munchies

#8. The AristoCats (1970) vs Robin Hood (1973)

Source: Movie Munchies

#9. Snow White (1937) vs Robin Hood (1973)

Source: Movie Munchies

However, according to American animator Floyd Norman who has worked with Walt Disney Animation Studios for years, the real reason behind those recycled scenes wasn’t money nor laziness. In an interview with GeekDad, Norman shared that it was Woolie Reitherman (the man behind “The Jungle Book”, “Robin Hood”, “The Sword in the Stone”, “Winnie the Pooh”, “101 Dalmatians”, “The AristoCats” and also one of the Nine Old Men of core animators at Walt Disney Productions) who came up with the idea.

“It’s actually harder and takes longer to redraw an existing sequence,” Norman said. “It’s a lot faster and easier to just do new animation, and it’s a lot more fun for the animators. But Woolie liked to play it safe and use stuff he knew would work. That’s all it was.”

What do you think of this funny tactic? Tell us your opinion in the comments below!

 

Related posts

Willem Dafoe Talks About Tom Holland And His Green Goblin In “Spider-Man: No Way Home”

Olivia

11 Marvel’s Moments That Weren’t In The Script But Ended Up Being Iconic

Susanna

11 Amazingly Realistic MCU Fan Arts That Would Make You Amaze

James

A “World War Hulk” Film Is Rumored To Begin Production Next Year

Olivia

15 Fascinating Fanarts That Can Completely Change Your Impression On Some Female Disney Characters

Margot Nolan

Indonesian Artist Re-Imagines Disney Characters In Her Own Style And It’s Worth Obsessing Over

Margot Nolan